"Newletter"


Scottish Stitch

Each line on the chart represents a fabric thread.

For this stitch bring your threaded needle up at 1 and take it down at 2, bring it up at 3 and take it down at 4 and so on.

There are many variations of this stitch some are shown.



This chart has grids with stitches worked over two fabric threads.

Chart Row of Pulled Scottish stitches


Each line on the chart represents a fabric thread.
One motif of the the Pulled Scottish stitch as depicted in the row above.

Pulled Scottish Stitch
This is the same as the Scottish Stitch, but when you are on top of the fabric at step 3 you pull the thread, work each stitch in the direction shown on the charted row of stitches.

In the chart "Row of Pulled Scottish stitches " the motifs are condensed. This is a charting problem as most charts you buy have a comment "this chart has grids with stitches worked over two fabric threads," but the stitch diagram almost always has a diagram with the stitch drawn over one grid or even one line. So that means an explanation of some sort is needed.

You would do a Satin stitch over one fabric thread intersection, then two fabric thread intersections, then three, then four, then three, then two, and finally one fabric intersection for each Scottish stitch. There are four pulled Scottish stitches in each motif depicted on the row of pulled Scottish stitches, and there are thirteen motifs on the charted row. So that means each quadrant of the stitch on the row of stitches in the Pulled Scottish stitch diagram is equal to one Scottish stitch as shown in the bottom diagram above.  Also note that the stitches are pointing in different directions.

The pulled fabric threads will add another dimension to this stitch creating the open look of lace. ©2001, Linda Fontenot, www.AmericanFolkArts.com and www.OvertheMoonDesigns.com